CONSERVATIVE NUT: Boy Scouts of America Scramble for Membership amid Declining Numbers


Be Prepared is the motto that millions of young men, including myself (proud Boy and Sea Scout), around the country learn and live by every year. For 107 years, the Boy Scouts of America have molded young men into leaders who have been at the forefront of business, medicine, politics, religion and a variety of other aspects of our society. When Boy Scouts was first created, it and its sister organizations were the premier youth organizations of the day and for the most part have remained so. As time has progressed, the BSA has had to deal with the challenge of competing for the attention of young men with inventions such as the T.V., the internet, computers, video games and a variety of other items and groups. This has resulted in the BSA struggling with membership for quite a while now.

Over the past 40 years, the BSA’s membership has been in a steady decline, with no sign of an end soon. In 2000, the BSA had 3.35 million total youth enrolled in all of its programs. As of 2013 that had fallen to 2.5 million youth and has continued to fall since then. Now, many organizations have had to deal with falling membership in the past but few as prominent as the BSA. The BSA has a program that is absolutely premier and has created some of the finest leaders the nation and the world have ever seen. Some famous former scouts include Neil Armstrong, Michael Bloomberg, President Gerald Ford, Robert Gates, Ross Perot, Donald Rumsfeld, Rex Tillerson, Mike Zinke, Rick Perry and many more.

Continue reading “CONSERVATIVE NUT: Boy Scouts of America Scramble for Membership amid Declining Numbers”

THE RESURGENT: The End of the Boy Scouts


By Russell Patten

We all knew this was coming. The Boy Scouts of America stood for over a century on its strong foundation of Judeo-Christian values, growing boys into young men, and young men into leaders.However, in recent years the BSA has allowed cracks to form in that foundation.

From the lifting of the ban on openly gay boys from joining the organization, to the sanctioning of openly gay adult leaders, to the encouragement of so-called “transgendered” boys to join, the BSA’s moral foundation has been rapidly and steadily eroding into dust.

As soon as the BSA changed the definition of the phrase “morally straight” in the generations-old Scout Oath back in 2013, allowing for homosexual membership, we all knew that this first compromise would not be the last. We all knew that it was only a matter of time before the BSA compromised itself into oblivion.

That day has now arrived.

Continue reading “THE RESURGENT: The End of the Boy Scouts”

AFA JOURNAL: Broken promises: 5 reasons Christians should leave Boy Scouts


Broken Promises

When you can’t trust even Boy Scouts to keep a promise, you know our culture is in deep trouble.

By Ed Vitagliano
On May 23 more than 1,400 delegates to the Boy Scouts’ National Council meeting voted on a resolution that called for an end to the organization’s ban on homosexual membership. By a 61-39% margin, delegates said yes, although by a similar voting margin, the ban on homosexual adult leaders was maintained.

Many Christians were shocked by the vote to open membership to homosexual youth. As a result, AFA is calling for Christians to exit the 2.6-million-youth organization and find other alternatives for their young men.

Here are some reasons to say goodbye to a once trusted organization:

1. BSA failed to stand for traditional values.
According to the Scout Law, bravery is an attribute that is supposed to characterize BSA and its members. What the organization has demonstrated instead is cowardice in the face of a persistent opponent.

There can be no doubt that homosexual activists have badgered the Boy Scouts for decades to abandon its ban on homosexuals. A 1992 lawsuit was filed in New Jersey by scoutmaster James Dale after it became public that he was a homosexual. Dale filed the suit after the state passed a law forbidding discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and the case made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Scouts narrowly won that decision in a landmark case, Boy Scouts of America v Dale (2000).

But activists refused to quit, constantly bringing pressure on BSA through more lawsuits, municipalities with non-discrimination laws, and funding cut off from non-profit groups and corporations.

Nevertheless, Christians and other moral conservatives expected the Boy Scouts to remain resolute. After all, in June 2012, BSA released the results of a two-year study on the issue that concluded that the ban on homosexuals was “the absolute best policy for the Boy Scouts of America.”

“Why, less than a year later, is this no longer true?” asked culture critic and writer Robert Reilly, senior fellow at American Foreign Policy Council.
That’s what everyone wanted to know.

Attorney John Stemberger, founder of On My Honor, a coalition of Scouting members who affirm the organization’s traditional values, said the BSA flip-flop demonstrates “that the organization’s values are not timeless, and instead they are governed by changing tides of polls, politics and public opinion.”

2. They have embraced moral relativism.
In its statement about the May 23 vote, the Boy Scouts said: “While people have different opinions about this policy, we can all agree that kids are better off when they are in Scouting.”

Deron Smith, BSA’s national spokesman, called the vote over the homosexual ban a matter of “personal preference.”
Is the controversy over homosexuality merely a matter of “personal preference,” akin to an argument over changing the color of Boy Scout uniforms? Bible-believing Christians don’t think so.

To state that the controversy was nothing more than the clash of “different opinions” reveals the triumph of moral relativism within the Scouts. It is to argue that all views are equally valid. That is a disappointment to the many Christian parents who expected the Boy Scouts to defend traditional values, not undermine them.

This is a stunning departure from the Boy Scouts’ defense offered in the Dale case, when it argued before the Supreme Court that BSA “teach[es] that homosexual conduct is not morally straight,” and does “not want to promote homosexual conduct as a legitimate form of behavior.”
Of course, that was then, and this is now. Apparently for BSA there is a time to stand for moral truth and a time to abandon it.

3. Homosexual men will soon serve as troop leaders.
Gary Glenn, president of American Family Association of Michigan, himself an Eagle Scout and the father of three Eagle Scouts, expects that the Boy Scouts will eventually be forced to accept openly homosexual adults as leaders.

He insisted in an opinion piece following the BSA vote that it will be a step that “will not be long in coming, whether by court order a few years from now or by vote of BSA officials themselves in a final act of moral surrender.”

The pressure to allow gay leaders has already begun with demands issued by homosexual activists.

According to Human Rights Campaign spokesman Paul Guequierre, the Scouts are “not on our good list yet.” He told Associated Press that HRC would deduct points in its influential annual equality rankings from any company that gave to BSA – until the Boy Scouts agreed to drop its ban on homosexual adults.

But the breaking point will probably come from legal pressure – i.e., lawsuits. When the U.S. Supreme Court narrowly granted BSA an exemption to New Jersey’s non-discrimination law, it was because the Scouts claimed they had a moral objection to homosexuality rooted in religious belief.
Since that defense has willingly been jettisoned, most observers believe BSA will soon be legally forced to allow homosexual men as leaders.
So what’s wrong with homosexual men serving as leaders in the Boy Scouts?

For Christian parents it will be problematic precisely because homosexuals will then be in a position of moral authority and influence in the lives of their sons. Those parents don’t put their boys into Scouting to have Christian values undermined by those whose very lifestyle stands in opposition to the Scriptures.

4. They will promote homosexuality.
The policy shift itself speaks volumes about the historic change in attitude within Boy Scouts of America. While the organization once viewed homosexuality as incompatible with BSA values, that is no longer the case.

In fact, the Supreme Court decision in Dale turned, in part, on this very issue: What message is sent by the presence of self-identified homosexual members in the Scouts, and how does that message reflect BSA’s actual moral views?

Writing in Dale’s majority opinion, then Chief Justice William Rehnquist said that the presence of homosexuals “would, at the very least, force the organization to send a message, both to the youth members and the world, that the Boy Scouts accepts homosexual conduct as a legitimate form of behavior.”

Since BSA did not approve of homosexuality, the high court reasoned, then forcing them to admit gay boys infringed on the Scouts’ religious beliefs. The Boy Scouts would be compelled to send a message they did not believe.

All that has now been flipped. If a ban on homosexual Scouts sent a message of moral disapproval of homosexuality, then ending the ban does the opposite.

Once homosexuality has been accepted, there is no going back. There is only going forward into promotion, or at the very least, the suppression of disapproval.

If discussions around the campfire turn to current events – such as the controversy over same sex marriage – what will impressionable young men hear? Will they be subjected to the litany of one-sided arguments pushed by activists, as gay Scouts speak up?

The answer is clearly – and sadly – yes.

5. Boys will be placed at risk.
Along with all the sad consequences of the BSA vote listed above, the worst danger is “the tragedy of countless boys who will experience sexual, physical and psychological abuse,” according to Stemberger.

Ironically, Stemberger noted the Scouts have always been aware of this hazard. “BSA’s own Youth Protection videos indicate that ‘70% of abuse to boys is by teenagers,’” he said.

“The question is whether the safety and security of boys in general are better off with the ‘open and avowed’ homosexual boys living and sleeping with them in close quarters,” Stemberger said.

“Based upon personal and candid conversations with BSA officials at the highest levels,” he said before the May vote, “BSA is fully aware that this proposed resolution will absolutely increase the risk of boy-on-boy sexual contact in Scouting, and yet there has been no discussion or risk analysis done on this topic in any of the resolution reports or presentations.” (Emphasis in original.)

Some might argue that this is merely Christian hysteria, but parents should ask themselves these questions: Would I allow my 14-year-old daughter to sleep in a tent with a 17-year-old boy? How about with a boy her own age? Why not?

If sexual attraction and the power of hormones in the teen years are a potent mixture that creates great danger for heterosexual kids, it won’t change when homosexual boys are thrown into the mix.

. . . . .

There is no saving Boy Scouts of America now. Once it stood strong and unwavering, as evidenced by its courageous stance in the Dale case.

Now, however, it has quickly collapsed under pressure and departed irrevocably from its original foundations. Sadly, the Boy Scouts will undoubtedly go the way of the Girl Scouts into that gray relativistic world of moral mush.

Our young people are already choking on the secular sludge served up by many public schools, the media and even some churches. Where can our young people turn to get the pure, unadulterated truth?

Now at least we finally know: It won’t be in the Boy Scouts.

_________________________________

What should you do? Leave.

Thousands of adults and youth are expected to be departing from Boy Scouts of America over the next several years.

Gary Glenn said the example of Scouting in Canada does not bode well for the U.S. organization. “Canadian Scouting made the same policy change in 1998, and its numbers fell from over 300,000 to less than 75,000 today,” he said.

Stemberger agreed with that assessment: “The BSA’s own estimates are that a policy change [over the gay ban] would create a ‘significant membership loss of 200,000 to 400,000 youth.’” (Emphasis in original.)

He argued that his estimates suggest an even worse scenario for the Boy Scouts: “500,000 to 600,000 youth leaving over a three-year period as the negative effects of the policy become evident. These estimates do not even calculate the adult volunteers and parents who will leave also.”

Loss of revenue, camp closings, staff and executive lay offs will also follow, he said.

AFA is asking supporters to take these immediate steps:

1. If you are in Scouting or have a son or grandson in Scouting, show your convictions by resigning from the organization. Your dropped membership will send a strong message that your values are steadfast, faithful and unchangeable.
2. If your church charters a Scouting unit, contact the pastor and Scouting committee members. Urge the church to drop the charter based on the truth of God’s word and Christian values
3. Find an alternative to BSA. To help you in this endeavor, we have compiled a list of faith-based organizations that promote scouting-type activities from a Christian perspective, which can be found at www.Scoutingalternatives.com or call 662-844-5036 X226.250.

FEDERALIST: If Not Even The Boy Scouts Can Celebrate Boys, They’re In Serious Trouble


If Not Even The Boy Scouts Can Celebrate Boys, They’re In Serious Trouble

In a world where masculinity is too often thought of as toxic and men disappear from the labor force and marriage, scouting was a place boys could be taught as boys, by men.
Lori Moylan

By

Every other Monday evening, a chaotic scene erupts at our local Presbyterian church. Young boys of all ages dart around, happily calling to each other across the room, alternating between sprints, tackles, and boisterous discussion of the latest update from Minecraft or their favorite YouTube star.

Eventually, a man in a tan shirt steps to the front, his hand held high in “the quiet sign.” A few minutes later, with the boys settled down, the ritual begins. It starts with the pledge, and is followed by the sacred words: “On my honor, I will do my best, to do my duty, to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.”

Next comes: “A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.”

When they are young, they struggle with the words, their faces scrunched as they try to remember the order. When they are older, they recite in monotone, the words slipping off their lips in a way that makes you wonder if they are internalizing the importance of the words.

Rituals for Becoming Men

The rest of the meeting slips by. If it’s just a den meeting, focused on one age group, the boys work on a practical skill with a moral backdrop. They might identify leaves and plants while learning the importance of conservation. Or they may practice whittling, learning the importance of care with a knife and the “blood circle” for maintaining a safe distance from others.

Regardless, each lesson provides each with an opportunity to speak up and share a story, serve as a group leader, and develop mindfulness in helping (or staying safe from) their fellow scouts. The meetings are loud, energetic, and more than a little disorderly. After eight long hours in school, the boys are obviously intoxicated by this one hour of hands-on, rough and tumble time with their pals.

Full pack meetings are different. They provide practice in public speaking, get the boys out of their comfort zones through funny skits and songs performed for all, and frequently have a program one particular den took responsibility for planning and practicing in advance. The boys always leave full of smiles, proud of their participation even if they are too cool to admit it.

As a mother and an assistant den leader, these bimonthly rituals have a place of sacred significance. I remember watching my older brother advance to Eagle Scout, admiring the practical skills, sense of greater responsibility, and strong self-motivation he developed. I eagerly waited for my son to come of scouting age, and relished watching him throw himself into the activities with reckless abandon.

In a world where masculinity is too often thought of as toxic and men disappear from the labor force, marriage, and self-sufficiency, scouting was our safe space, a place boys could be taught as boys, by men, on the importance of developing into strong leaders with outstanding moral character. I’ve watched the men who lead our troops sacrifice so much of their lives, hoping that their tireless work imparts some nuggets of wisdom to help these young men follow the right path.

The Costs of Adding Girls to a Boys’ Space

The Boy Scouts of America’s  decision to begin allowing girls raises many questions for me. The first are practical. Despite the directive to allow separate dens at the Cub Scout level and forced separation at the Boy Scout level, it’s hard to imagine enough young girls joining Cub Scouts to fill a tiger troop on their own. The Boy Scouts have struggled with declining membership, experienced even by our local troop as we’ve increased recruitment efforts at local schools and community events. Recruiting a few girls across a wide age range seems more likely to yield mixed dens at the young ages, similar to my son’s Little League teams, which frequently had one or two girls in the mix.

Even if it remains separate at the den level, will full pack meetings continue to be separate? If so, it seems to cut into the argument that the program wants to be an inclusive one-stop-shop for busy parents with separate meetings to attend, award ceremonies to photograph, and weekend activities, even assuming they occur simultaneously. It either will require the same additional parenting time something like Girl Scouts requires, or require the busy families and single moms the Boy Scouts claim to be catering toward to be in two places at once. It seems likely, then, in the end, for more things to be combined than not, both for practical reasons and because everyone knows separate but equal really isn’t equal.

Overworked leaders would find additional recruitment for separate dens, increased logistical challenges, and to some extent, additional burdens on the churches and community organizations that host these troops if everything runs on separate tracks. As an assistant den leader, the possible challenges to running some combination of separate and single tracks makes my head spin.

So, What’s the Point of Scouting?

But certainly our girls and the development of their moral character is worth some additional logistical challenge. That is, after all, why so many families already do both Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, or put their girls into whatever program they think will best develop them into strong women capable of taking on the world. My parents chose both Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, as well as other mentally, spiritually, and physically enriching activities, from debate club to piano lessons to church clubs and soccer. The real question cuts to the heart of scouting itself, and its purpose in the modern age.

When my son was two, we moved hundreds of miles from home in Georgia to the DC area. I was excited for the many opportunities he’d have living in our nation’s capital. The good local schools, the countless enrichment activities, and the cultural experience would all provide him an excellent foundation.

But I was also nervous. Although my hometown had many individuals, especially men, experiencing failure to launch, I was also aware I was removing him from family and an established community for the unknown, and that I needed to recreate that community if he didn’t have grandfathers and uncles to pass along life lessons he’s less keen to learn from mom.

Scouting for me was an important part of that plan. The scout oath and law embody what I want my son to become, and stand in stark contrast to the path many men are following. To do his best to do his duty, rather than avoiding hard work and labor. To be trustworthy, loyal, and courteous rather than take advantage of those around him, especially women. To be thrifty, rather than indulgent. To be cheerful and brave, rather than giving in to hopelessness.

Maybe the decline of men in and of itself is a condemnation of the utility and marketability of the Boy Scout program. After all, the program is dedicated to turning men into leaders, not shirkers. Scouting numbers have dwindled in concurrence with men disappearing from social life. But with growing recognition of the problem facing men, scouting is well-poised to serve as one answer.

If Female-Specific Is Good, Why Isn’t Male-Specific?

We all acknowledge the importance of having a safe place for girls, where they can confront and discuss the unique challenges we face as women, learn to be strong and self-sufficient, learn to work together, and celebrate who they are and what makes them unique. The countless programs that have developed just for girls from STEM camps to girls-only running clubs to the Girl Scouts themselves have helped build a strong foundation for female empowerment.

We’ve learned as a society that having female-specific spaces and clubs aids in development. It’s not that girls don’t need to embody the lessons taught in the Boy Scout Oath and the Boy Scout Law, it’s that we know they face different challenges, and displaying those moral characteristics means different things based on different circumstances. Having a place to teach those virtues to girls, by women, creates a unique opportunity for discussion and bonding.

Scouts teaches boys how to process their feelings, channel their emotions, and tackle the world as men.

Boys deserve the same. We can’t simultaneously deride the disappearing man, moan the toxic effects of untethered masculinity, and demand virtue without providing a place to teach it in a way that’s tailored to boys’ learning styles and interests. Boy Scouts provides an outlet where boys push and learn boundaries in their pack, develop integrity and social responsibility, and practice effective leadership.

As I think back on my last five years as an assistant leader, I remember the countless times the boys tested themselves and each other. I remember the boy struggling with his parents’ divorce and the ramifications of new people in his life, I remember the boy who struggled in school with abundant energy and focus issues, the boy who moved so frequently due to his family’s military status, and how scouting gave them all a home. For a few hours a month, they could let loose and learn.

I remember how they opened up about things on their minds, how their forced boyish emotional guards would come down, even if just for a few minutes, as they worked and talked with their fellow scouts and leaders, and how the moments could come crashing down in laughter after very boyish jokes that make a mother cringe. My son has struggles of his own, and I saw scouting teach him to handle them wisely and bravely. Each moment was important. I was grateful such a place still existed.

Scouts teaches boys how to process their feelings, channel their emotions, and tackle the world as men. It teaches them to explore and question in a judgment-free zone. Behaviors too frequently shut down on a school playground are indulged within reason. They learn to appreciate themselves for who they are, but also how to be the best version of themselves. They can connect their impulses and desires to a grander good, and see their places in the social order.

Will that continue after this decision? It’s hard to say. But it’s difficult not to view the recent BSA decision as one that chips away at the most important part of scouting. I doubt the decision will much affect the rest of my son’s experience as he moves on to Boy Scouts. But if the BSA, of all organizations, fails to understand the fundamental importance of its original mission, it’s hard to imagine how we can tackle the problems affecting men in the long-term.

Lori Moylan lives with her family in the Washington DC area. Follow her on Twitter @Lori_SuLin.

1950 Valley Forge Jamboree


Valley Forge and the scouting movement have a natural affinity. It’s a genuine shame BSA Inc sold itself into moral servitude to finance the boondoggle that is The Summit Bechtel Reserve.

76db3368-155d-451f-672dcbd957def692

This commemorative stamp was issued by the U.S. Postal Service on the occasion of the Jamboree, which was also Scouting’s Fortieth Anniversary.

boy_scouts_bsa_stamp

Comparison of the 1911 and Centennial editions of Boy Scout Handbooks


Scouting Then and Now.
The Boy Scouts of America: Then and Now — A Comparison of the 1911 and Modern Handbooks and Merit Badges

I stumbled on this today looking for material to train our Webelos scouts for their Arrow of Light award.  The present handbooks are simply awful — the Soviets wrote more inspiring manufacturing reports, translated into English than the soul-killing, mind-numbing awful that is the Boy Scout Handbook series today.

The Art of Manliness blog — one of our favorites! — took a close look at the Centennial edition of the BSA Handbook and compared it to the classic original. This portion was largely inspired by a 2013 Clairmont Institute essay by Kathleen Arnn.

The Boy Scouts of America: Then and Now — A Comparison of the 1911 and Modern Handbooks and Merit Badges

 

What has been dropped or reduced in the modern handbook is telling. Gone is the section on chivalry, which traced the Boy Scouts’ heritage back through the pioneers and Pilgrims, and to the knights of the Middle Ages. While the 1911 handbook has a lengthy chapter on Patriotism and Citizenship (including a letter from Theodore Roosevelt on “Practical Citizenship”), which outlines the history of the United States, the meaning of the flag, and the purpose of various governmental bodies, the modern handbook has greatly shrunk the discussion of such things in both length and detail. The original is also generously peppered with references to great men in history for young boys to emulate, while the mention of such “heroes” is almost entirely absent from the one published in 2009 (being inspired by history isn’t much in fashion these days).

Perhaps most striking is the different way in which the two guides address the idea of good character. The original didn’t shy away from strong admonitions like, “It is horrible to be a coward. It is weak to yield to fear and heroic to face danger without flinching,” and “The honor of a scout will not permit of anything but the highest and the best and the manliest. The honor of a scout is a sacred thing, and cannot be lightly set aside or trampled on.”

vintage illustration from boy scouts handbook helping old lady

In contrast, the modern version frames its discussion of character in terms of its inoffensive modern equivalent: leadership and personal development. Instead of being couched in the absolute language of moral virtue, doing the right thing becomes a matter or “making the most of yourself” and “getting along with others.”

Arnn’s original essay — well worth the five minutes it takes to read completely — may be found here. Perhaps we shall post on it later.

AOM’s contribution was to compare merit badges from 1910 to merit badges of 2010. As there are a number of badges that survived the century, this was a straight forward task. The results are a side by side set of graphics with the requirements of each.

what stands out for all the modern badges is how much longer and more involved the guidelines are today than they used to be. In the 1911 handbook, earning each badge involved the completion of a short list of one-sentence requirements. Modern badge requirements, on the other hand, run to as many as ten paragraph-long sections, the first of which is always a discussion of the need to discuss safety considerations with one’s leader. The gardening badge for example, requires the Scout to discuss with his counselor what hazards he might encounter if he happened to unfortunately plant his tomatoes near a beehive.

All old time Scouts see this. The result is that Scouting is perhaps more boring even than school, so the handbooks become expensive bricks, heeded mainly in the breech.

Why? Observe:

Camping

Camping is the activity for which the Boy Scouts are best known. In comparing the original camping merit badge to today’s, one can see how the hands-on requirements have been loosened; for example, Scouts formerly had to sleep out for 50 nights, know how to build a fire without matches, and construct a raft. On the flip side, the modern badge has decreased that requirement to 20 nights, and has greatly expanded the more mental requirements — making checklists, creating plans, and describing different camping guidelines and pieces of equipment.

boy scouts camping badge requirements 1911 versus 2012

Perhaps the most compelling contrast is found in the Inventions merit badge:

boy scouts inventing badge requirements 1911 versus 2012

Yes, you read that correctly.  Our boys were expected to invent something and patent it.

Arnn captured the cucking self-abnegation of BSA honchos since the Improved Scouting Program nearly destroyed it in the 1970s.  Here is an extended quote:

Today, there is a different approach to leadership: “success begins with a vision—picturing yourself where you want to be.” And because anyone can have a vision, anyone can be a leader. “You are a collection of wonderful talents, ideas, and experiences,” the new handbook’s Leadership chapter begins. “What do you want your future to look like tomorrow?”

The old handbook spoke proudly of the chivalric tradition; the new apologizes for the antiquated example of the knights. It sandwiches a few cursory paragraphs on moral virtue between a lengthy discussion of drugs and alcohol and a section on sexual responsibility. Moral choices are reduced to healthy choices. Doing the courageous thing becomes equivalent to refusing a cigarette at a party.

Instead of an exciting chapter on Patriotism and Citizenship, the handbook now offers a perfunctory discussion, re-titled just “Citizenship.” In the new handbook Scouts are citizens of their country, but also of the world. There are the same detailed instructions for folding and flying the flag, but the accompanying history lesson has been shortened and stripped of its vividness. There are, by my count, four heroes in the book. They are the founders of Scouting: British founder Robert Baden Powell, the naturalist Ernest Thompson Seton, outdoorsman Daniel Carter Beard, and James E. West, who led the BSA through its first 30 years. Each gets a sentence and a picture. American heroes, so numerous and colorful in the original handbook, are almost absent. Washington and Lincoln are each mentioned one time. Here is their sentence: “We remember the sacrifices and achievements of Americans with federal holidays, including observances of the birthdays of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.”

BSA was and remains a hollow shell of its formerly unquestioned status as the premiere training ground for our sons. Pandering to POCs became its own priority, even to the neglect and insult their core audience.  Membership is in free fall because BSA doesn’t want white boys.  They don’t want patriots or Christian believers.  They want your money and are willing to extract it from you by the extortion of your sons.

What would the knights of old do?

 

#EpicFail: Americans don’t want girls in the Boy Scouts


UPDATE: Would those millenial democrats be the same millenials who think Communism sounds pretty chill?

#EpicFail

The only segment clearly in favor of this move is “millennial democrats” who are the absolute least likely ever to consider joining the Boy Scouts. Clearly, market appeal had nothing to do with this decision because any half way competent survey would have revealed the exact same result.

How many of you remember “Scouting/USA”? It was the first go at unisex, un-boyed, un-Americanized scouting in 1972ish.  It even featured a new red logo, red being the standard issue color of the international socialist revolutionary movement i.e., communism.  The handbook was stripped of scoutcraft, community organizing, “child rearing”(!), drug use, and trendy conservation taking its place.  Membership collapsed and BSA had to hire back the hated Green Bar Bill Hillcourt to pick up the pieces.

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/first-read/majority-opposes-boy-scouts-decision-allowing-girls-join-n815691

 

Oct 31 2017, 5:07 pm ET

Majority Opposes Boy Scouts Decision Allowing Girls to Join

by Carrie Dann

A majority of Americans oppose the decision by the Boy Scouts of America to start admitting girls next year, a new poll from NBC News and the Wall Street Journal shows. But, as with many other issues in the current polarized era, political ideology has a lot to do with how the public views the new policy.

Nearly six-in-ten Americans — 57 percent — disagree with the move to allow girls to join the Boy Scouts, with 37 percent voicing strong opposition.

Read the rest here

Epic Fail