Boy Scouts Is Out, BSA And Girls Are In


Because appropriating masculine culture is good for grrlz. Besides, there’ll be less for the boys and they don’t count anyway.

From the comments:

chefmark Jan 30, 2019 11:02am
I myself do note care for this ruling, If its a group of Girls that are off on there own separate from the Boy’s unless an activity or camparoo, Then they should actually be in Girl Scouts and have them change their rules, that both clubs be allowed for the jamborees and other activities and keep both clubs like they were designed to be and do things to Boost up each child by peers like themselves, Then when there older, well thats when they have ROTC, i just think there to young to mingle, but i also believe they should also have access to make a car out of wood, camping, but The clubs themselves should accommodate those things.

sodaspop Jan 29, 2019 5:37pm
I guess that since the Boy Scouts no longer teach boys how to be men it wouldn’t hurt to let the girls in.

By ELIANNA SPITZER
Jan 29, 2019
The Falmouth Enterprise

Starting this Friday, February 1, Falmouth girls can start earning Boy Scout badges.

February 1 marks the renaming of the Boy Scouts of America “Boy Scouts” program to “Scouts BSA” and the incorporation of all-girl troops.

Troop 137 in Falmouth will be part of a national wave of all-girls troops joining Scouts BSA.

They aim to offer girls the same opportunities that have been afforded to boys through the Boy Scouts program, said Diane M. Mahoney, Troop 137’s Scoutmaster.

About 15 girls have already expressed interest in the program, which serves girls from ages 11 through 17.

The girls-only troop will function like other all-male troops in Falmouth. The girls will work toward the same ranks and badges, following the same handbook.

“The requirements for a swimming merit badge will be the same whether you’re a boy or girl,” said Michael R. Riley, scout executive of the BSA Cape Cod and Islands Council.

The only time that troops will mix will be during camporees, special Cape-wide events. Members of co-ed Scouting programs like Venture already attend.

Scouts in every troop, regardless of gender, will get new uniforms from Scouts BSA to reflect the name change, Ms. Mahoney explained. Her troop’s uniforms will not look different from the ones given to the all-boys troops.

Girls who participate in Scouts BSA will also be able to participate in a Girl Scout troop, said Ms. Mahoney. Her youngest daughter, Erin, has been a Girl Scout for a year and plans to participate in both programs.

The new troop is just “one more activity to get them out of the house, get them outside and get them socializing with people,” Ms. Mahoney said.

Girls will be able to work toward Eagle Scout rank for the first time, an achievement previously reserved for Boy Scouts.

The prestigious ranking is awarded to Scouts who complete a set of rigorous requirements by their 18th birthday. It can be listed on college applications and résumés.

The accomplishment is a “recognizable achievement that they have not been able to work at or get as females,” Ms. Mahoney said.

The requirements for the ranking can take at least two years to complete. The national organization added a provision for girls and boys between 16 and 18 joining this year. They will be given extra time to complete the requirements.

Several weekend trips are planned for the new troop that will introduce the Scouts to rock climbing, whitewater rafting, and rifle shooting.

Members of Troop 137 will need to raise funds for all their upcoming trips, but Ms. Mahoney is eager to get started. She does not want financial limitations to prevent anyone from participating in the program.

The February 1 celebration will kick off with an event at L.L. Bean in Mashpee Commons sponsored by the BSA Cape Cod and Islands Council. From 6 to 7:30 PM they will publicly recognize the program name change and the new troops.

Falmouth girls interested in signing up for Troop 137 can head to Waquoit Congregational Church today as early as 6 PM. The Scoutmaster and assistant Scoutmaster will have activities set up to help the prospective scouts start earning patches.

An axe yard, wood tools and knife safety demonstrations will offer new Scouts the opportunity to earn the Totin’ Chip, a safety requirement for carrying pocket knives and using wood tools. Campfire starting and fire safety, as well as outdoor cooking, will also be available.

After the activities, there will be a movie night and sleep-in. Three girls, weather permitting, have expressed interest in camping outside the church that night to get started on their camping merit badge, Gregory Remedis, Troop 137 assistant Scoutmaster, said.

This will be Ms. Mahoney’s first time leading a troop. Mr. Remedis is a veteran in the Scouting scene. He has been a unit coordinator and troop leader for the Girl Scouts as well as a Scoutmaster for Falmouth Boy Scout Troop 42. He is excited to get the program started.

Scouts BSA will seek to address needs that have always existed in the community, said Mr. Riley: “I’ve been working for the Boy Scouts for 39 years and we’ve always been asked, ‘This is a wonderful program for my son, why can’t my daughter do it too’?”

All-girl troops in Yarmouth and Martha’s Vineyard are also slated to be recognized Friday, Mr. Riley said. “I’m personally thrilled. I think it’s a huge step forward,” he added.

Boy Scouts of America, the national organization, announced the addition of girls to its programs in October 2017. Girls have been able to take part in Cub Scouts, the Scouting program that runs from kindergarten through 5th grade, since early 2018. Mr. Riley estimated that there are about 67 girls in Cub Scout troops across the Cape.